Does Hollywood discriminate against young black actors?



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Shortly after the Oscars ended Sunday, Samuel L. Jackson sent an e-mail to a Times reporter wondering why no black men had been chosen to present awards on the film world’s biggest stage.

“It’s obvious there’s not ONE Black male actor in Hollywood that’s able to read a teleprompter, or that’s ‘hip enuf,’ for the new academy demographic!” Jackson wrote. “In the Hollywood I saw tonite, I don’t exist nor does Denzel, Eddie, Will, Jamie, or even a young comer like Anthony Mackie!”

Jackson may be on to something, at least when it comes to the young comers.

There is still a sizable number of black actors in Hollywood with box-office clout and meaty roles, a point that will be underscored when the NAACP hands out its annual Image Awards in Los Angeles Friday night. Will Smith is the biggest movie star in the world, a title he’s held now for several years, and Denzel Washington remains at the peak of his box-office powers.

But most of the prominent male black stars sit on the other side of 40. The best known of the next generation — say, Derek Luke (36), Chiwetel Eijofor (33), Idris Elba (39) and Mackie (31) — are not only less influential, they’re not nearly as popular in their 30s as the previous crop was at their age. (Washington, for instance, had already won an Oscar and made “Glory,” “Malcolm X” and “Philadelphia” before he hit the big 4-0.)

That’s not because any of these actors aren’t capable of pulling off a “Malcolm X” or a “Philadelphia,” of course. It’s because they’re not given the chance. Mackie has one of the more substantive studio roles for a younger black actor in a while as Matt Damon’s guardian angel in this weekend’s “The Adjustment Bureau.” But it’s hardly the role of a lifetime.

“It’s frustrating that the movies I want to make I haven’t been able to make,” Mackie told 24 Frames. “Orlando Bloom was given 15 opportunities after ‘Lord of the Rings.’ Black men are given no opportunities.”

Race in Hollywood is a subject close to Mackie’s heart. He’s studiously avoided the “Who’s Your Caddys” and “Big Momma’s Houses” of the film world, going instead to indies such as “The Hurt Locker” and, almost as frequently, to the stage.

“In the early 1990’s, every black actor you know now was starting out and making movies. They were making more movies under Daddy Bush than we are under Obama, which is ridiculous,” Mackie said.

The scarcity of black roles in 2011 is partly a function of fewer movies being made, and certainly fewer serious-minded movies at the studios. When Washington and Smith were coming up, there were routinely chances to make those types of films. (Smith made “Six Degrees of Separation” with MGM when he was 24 and in the middle of shooting a network sitcom.) Now you need to go indie or wait for lightning to strike at a studio.

The growth of the black-comedy niche may also have, paradoxically, resulted in fewer opportunities, as black actors get cordoned off in the land of “Soul Plane.”

But while some studio executives will privately say they’re simply reacting to the marketplace realities when it comes to casting younger black actors in lead roles of mainstream films, the actors don’t buy it. “They say there’s not an audience for black stars, but that’s because you’re not feeding [audiences] them,” Mackie said.

Actors can take a long time to develop their talents and establish a relationship with an audience. The dearth of young black actors may be obscured in 2011, with Washington and Smith — not to mention Don Cheadle, Jamie Foxx, Forest Whitaker and others — still making movies. But one wonders what type of entertainment world we’ll be occupying when these stars are in their 50s and 60s and Hollywood has cultivated almost no one to take their place.

–Steven Zeitchik

Twitter.com/ZeitchikLAT

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Photo: Anthony Mackie, left, John Slattery and others in “The Adjustment Bureau.” Credit: Universal Pictures






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